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More than 4,000 residents have been on fleeing because of the three-day attacks in Tagaung township.

More than 4,000 residents have been on fleeing because of the three-day attacks in Tagaung township.

It was in Mandalay Division, Thabakkyin Township, In the Tagong District, where there was a three-day battle from April 13th to 15th. Also, as the military council troops fired from the air, more than 4,000 residents from about 10 villages have fled, according to local residents and members of PaKaPha.

Residents from Tagong, OkeshitKone which is on the east side of the highway, Mine Dine, Pekong, Yinkhwin, kyaukayke, NyaungKone and Suutaw and some residents from nearby villages are also fleeing.

The Tagaung People's Defense Force said that at least four battles broke out as more than a hundred soldiers from the Military Council's (88th) Division, stationed on the mountain of the nickel factory in Thanakekyin City, entered the Tagaung area in a convoy.

An official of the Tagong People's Defense Force said that the military council force also fired at them with a jet fighter, and some houses were also set on fire.

"The army of the military council came and fired with YAK-130 fighter jets in total of five times, when their side of the troops were hurt and had to retreat. There were no injuries to the people, but about three houses on the side of Okeshitkone village road were set on fire."

The military council troops are currently retreating towards Tagong town, but they did not retreat along the road, but they retreated step by step after entering the villages and staying at monasteries throughout the village roads.

The Tagong People's Defense Forces said that more than 20 military council soldiers were killed during the battle, but RFA still could not confirm this number.

The Military Council has not released any news regarding this issue.

Until April 17th, the day of the Myanmar New Year, the jet fighters of the Military Council are still hovering over the villages, according to local residents and the Tagong PakaPha group.


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